news & articles

Your go to place to stay updated with the latest news and fun articles from the finance and crypto worlds.

ALERTS | ICOS | STOCKS | CRYPTOS | OPINIONS

© Copyright GGG Inc.

The Content is for informational purposes only, you should not construe any such information or other material as legal, tax, investment, financial, or other advice. All Content on this site is information of a general nature and does not address the circumstances of any particular individual or entity. Nothing in the Site constitutes professional and/or financial advice, nor does any information on the Site constitute a comprehensive or complete statement of the matters discussed or the law relating thereto.

Crypto Death Threat Scams More Frequent, FBI Warns Cases Are ‘Heavily Underreported’

The FBI warns Internet users about death threat hoax emails as a new type of cryptocurrency extortion, victims are highly disturbed.

The US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has warned Internet users about false death threats as a new method of cryptocurrency extortion, ABC California reported on Friday Jan. 26.

One of the victims, introducing themselves as Christiane, used FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) to inform the agency that she received an email with a death threat. The email said: “I’ll be short. I’ve got an order to kill you,” and demanded Christiane to pay $2,800 in U.S. dollars or Bitcoin in order be spared by the would-be assassin.

Even though she realized that it was a scam, Christiane told ABC7 that she found the message distressing enough to make her look over her shoulder in fear of a potential threat on the way to work.

According to FBI agent Laura Eimiller, the case represents a new method of online extortion that is specifically increasing in frequency in California right now, ABC reports.

Eimiller also emphasizes the fact that the emails are structured and written in a way that is likely to make the target feel deeply affected, even if they are able to recognize them as a hoax.

Thus, FBI warns Internet users and encourages potential victims to provide information about any new cases, given that the number of reports is “about 15 percent of the scams that are actually taking place,” according to Eimiller. She added that the crimes like these are “heavily underreported.”

No Comments

Post A Comment